Lemo’s Grammar Lessons, Pt. 2

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Lemonade, May 19, 2019.

Become a member to no longer see this ad. :)

  1. Lemonade
    Offline

    Lemonade Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,145
    My other thread went the way of the white buffalo, so here’s an updated one:

    Lesson 1: Learn the difference between "you're" and "your."
    Your: this is a possessive pronoun in the 2nd person, meaning someone is holding possession of something.
    Example: Billy, is this your couch?
    You're: a contraction of the two words "you" and "are."
    Example: You're the love of my couch.

    Lesson 2: difference in words such as "two," "too," and "to."
    Two:
    a number.
    Example: I would like two couches, please.
    Too: an adverb describing having a certain amount of something. Also, when at the end of a sentence, there should be a comma before it if you wish. The comma is purely for stylistic reasons.
    Example: "That is too many couches!" Bethany exclaimed. "I think so, too," Lemo said.
    To: a prepositional phrase or the beginning of an infinitive. It describes a location to where it goes, or the beginning of an action.
    Example 1: I should go to the couch store. Example 2: I need to go.

    Lesson 3: When to use commas correctly when referring to names.
    1) Use commas to names that are used in questions or stating something.
    Example: Billy, can I have a couch?
    2) Do not use commas for every single time you have a name.
    Incorrect: I should avoid contact with, Billy.
    Correct: I should avoid contact with Billy.

    You might be wondering, "Why don't you put a comma there?" You don't put punctuation in a prepositional phrase. It just doesn't work.
    3) Use commas when greeting someone properly.
    Incorrect: Hello Lemo.
    Correct: Hello, Lemo.


    Lesson 4: Capitalization
    1)
    When referring to a proper noun
    Example: The West Side is a lovely part of America's Couch Company.
    2) The beginning of a complete sentence
    Example: Senior always says, "Hello!"
    3) When referring to a location that can be a part of a country, e.g. West, South, etc.
    Example: I'm going down South this winter for couch hunting.
    4) When referring to someone's name
    Example: "Jason is always looking for those couches," Mary exclaimed
    5) Abbreviations, acronyms, holidays, months, days of the week.
    Example: C.T.C is meeting on Christmas day on Tuesday, December 25th, 2029.
    6) Languages, nationalities, and religions:
    Example: English was born from the Roman Empire from Latin, mainly seen as a Christian empire towards the end of the reign.
    7) Companies, books, poems, songs, major works of literature, etc.
    Example: The London Bridge Corp. wrote the book Falling Down after the poem "How to Fall" was introduced.
    -There are more, but feel free to Google them.

    Lesson 5: Pronouns
    1)
    Use them in place of a repeating noun
    Incorrect: Billy likes couches. Billy hates chairs. Billy wants to go hunting, but Billy is scared.
    Correct: Billy likes couches. He hates chairs. He wants to go hunting, but he's scared.

    2) Use them in place of possession for a noun or proper noun in the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd person.
    Incorrect: Billy wants Billy's couches. Billy hates Billy's chairs.
    Correct: Billy wants his couches. He hates his chairs.


    Lesson 6: Semicolons
    1)
    Use them when having an independent clause followed by another independent clause following either the compound sentence structure or the compound-complex sentence structure.
    Example: While Lemo was driving his couch, he saw a bird; however, the bird stopped and moved out of the way.
    2) Use them when there is a long list of things that are separated by commas.
    Example: Lemo loves his couches made of wood; the lessons of pianos, violins, and guitars; and his very own piano.

    Lesson 7: Colons
    1)
    When referring to a list of things followed by a proper preceding phrase.
    Example: Lemo wants this for lunch: food, drinks, and money.
    2) Possibly when joining independent clauses to create a more structured sentence.
    Example: Lemo got what he deserved: he got his bag of chips and soda from a long day at work.
    3) A quotation
    Example: Lemo always said this: "Live life so you have more of life.”
    4) Starting a business letter.
    Example:
    Dear Ms. Miss:


    Lesson 8: "it's" vs. "its"
    It's
    : a contraction of the two words "it" and "is."
    Example: It's a lovely day outside with the couches roaming free!
    Its: a possessive pronoun referring to "it" having possession of an object.
    Example: Its lunch was empty because of the couches.

    Lesson 9: Color vs. colour
    Color is for people who have an American-English background, while colour is for people who have a British-English background.
    Example: (Nevermind, there isn't one because it's pointless!)

    Lesson 10: Possession with Apostrophes
    Use apostrophes when referring to possession of a certain noun.
    Example: Jimmy's couch was roaming free.

    Lesson 11: Ou vs. o
    Again, "ou" is for people who have a British-English background of learning, and "o" is for people with an American-English background of learning.

    Lesson 12: Quotation Marks
    1)
    Use this when referring to a direct quotation
    Example: Bethany said, "Couches are so cool!"
    2) If a comma or period is followed by a quotation mark, it always goes inside the quotation mark
    Example: "Couches are so cool," said Bethany.
    3) While writing a paper or story, start a new paragraph when the speaker changes and indent it as well.
    4) If it is an indirect quotation, do not include quotation marks.
    Example: Bethany said that she loves quotation marks. She thinks they're fun.
    5) Use quotation marks for poems, short stories, chapters of a book, sections of a magazine, or shorter works. Italicize bigger works such as musicals, books, magazines, movies, etc.
    Example: Time Magazine said under "Death by Destruction" that we should buy more couches.
    6) When asking a question, don't include the "?" in the quotation.
    Example: Who was it that said "live life to the fullest"?

    Lesson 13: Anyone vs. any one. Everyone vs. every one
    Anyone is referring to any person, while any one refers to any unidentified noun.
    Everyone is referring to every person, while every one refers to every unidentified noun.

    Lesson 14: Their, they're, and there
    Their
    : a personal pronoun signifying someone having possession of an object.
    Example: Their couches are so amazing!
    They're: a contraction of the two words "they" and "are"
    Example: They're so helpful in the couch department!
    There: an adverb signifying location of an object
    Example: Can you get me that couch over there?

    Lesson 15: Prepositional Phrases
    1)
    A prepositional phrase is a phrase beginning with a preposition–at, behind, under, through, etc.–being used as an advert or adjective phrase.
    Example: Jane walked through the forest to get to the couch factory. (This is an adverb phrase because it describes where Jane walked.)
    2) There are single-word prepositions and compound-prepositions.
    Example: Instead of this couch, I want this one!
    3) When a preposition is the last word in a sentence, it is an adverb.
    Example: Jane fell down. (Adverb, describes where/how she fell)
    Example: Jane fell down the hole. (Prepositional phrase, modifies the word "fell")


    If you have ANY topic you would like covered, feel free to comment below, and I will make a writeup of it.

    Lemo's Lessons is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization exempt from federal taxes. Donations are welcome. Feel free to inbox for donation arrangements or advertisements.
     
    • Winner x 2
    • Bad Spelling x 2
    • Like x 1
    • Agree x 1
    • Informative x 1
  2. Monster_Sparklez
    Offline

    Monster_Sparklez Yee yee Bubba Premium Premium

    Messages:
    1,159
    IGN:
    Monster_Sparklez
    1st :D this is actually helpful hopefully I will start typing correctly.
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Funny Funny x 2
  3. BertBerry
    Offline

    BertBerry Moderator Staff Member

    Moderator
    Messages:
    8,557
    IGN:
    BurpBerry
    i leernt aloot ferom dis thered. tanks lemonads 1
     
  4. Bard
    Offline

    Bard Active Member

    Messages:
    769
    IGN:
    Audibility
    Their are so many things wrong with everyone of these lesson's
     
  5. trin
    Offline

    trin beamer boy Premium

    Messages:
    568
    IGN:
    twxntyonepilots
    would you like sum couches
     
  6. Gamzee24
    Offline

    Gamzee24 Active Member

    Messages:
    1,432
    936F6B0A-369E-4C48-AAB2-6D6A5A419D39.png
     
    • Dislike Dislike x 2
    • Like Like x 1
  7. archerexpert777
    Online

    archerexpert777 Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,169
    IGN:
    archerexpert777
  8. instagram model
    Offline

    instagram model Member

    Messages:
    65
    IGN:
    darers
    Tasty, couches thayr'e my favourite
     
  9. MindSensation
    Offline

    MindSensation Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,512
    Biggest one that always pissed me off was people saying "could of" instead of "could have"
     
  10. Lemonade
    Offline

    Lemonade Senior Member

    Messages:
    10,145
    YEP, and expresso
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. Gamzee24
    Offline

    Gamzee24 Active Member

    Messages:
    1,432
    Not my grammar bish remove the dislike
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Optimistic Optimistic x 1
  12. Super_Dave1236
    Offline

    Super_Dave1236 Active Member

    Messages:
    94
    Love it! Thanks!
     
  13. archerexpert777
    Online

    archerexpert777 Senior Member

    Messages:
    2,169
    IGN:
    archerexpert777
    I can now finally use grammar to not get a traffic ticket like what happened last week because I ran a stop sign and my poor grammar skills failed me :( (kidding I rarely drive)
     
  14. Laini
    Offline

    Laini Nervous hee hee Premium

    Messages:
    4,051
    IGN:
    JamesIsCancelled
    A lot of people really need this lesson. I’m gonna send it on LOOL
     
    • Cookie Cookie x 1
  15. MrGallifrey
    Offline

    MrGallifrey Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    372
    IGN:
    MrGallifrey
    My biggest issue is people who don't know how to use "An"

    You use an instead of a when there is a vowel present after.
    Example: "Laini stole an egg" Not: "Laini stole a egg"
    It causes me so much stress when you try to pronounce the a sound and other vowel sound in succession. :(
     
  16. Tristannlyons
    Offline

    Tristannlyons Active Member

    Messages:
    20
    Also a vowel sound. Such as: Laini stole that egg an hour ago.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  17. Gamzee24
    Offline

    Gamzee24 Active Member

    Messages:
    1,432
    Why we making fun of laini? We should be making fun of BertBerry ;)
     
  18. Tristannlyons
    Offline

    Tristannlyons Active Member

    Messages:
    20
    No clue.
     
  19. BertBerry
    Offline

    BertBerry Moderator Staff Member

    Moderator
    Messages:
    8,557
    IGN:
    BurpBerry
    stoap haraasing mee
     
  20. AncientOak
    Offline

    AncientOak Ancient Member

    Messages:
    801
    IGN:
    AncientOak
    th3Nks soo Meeny :D me Le4rn yayy
     

Become a member to no longer see this ad. :)

Share This Page