Skyblock is looking for developers!

Discussion in 'Discussion' started by mat t, Feb 19, 2019.

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  1. mat t
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    mat t Developer Staff Member

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    [​IMG]

    Are you an experienced Java developer? Do you have Linux know-how?
    We are looking for YOU!

    Skyblock is looking for talented Java developers to work on our custom Skyblock plugin, and other software utilities. Below you can find the list of requirements and nice-t0-haves.

    Required Skills:
    • Must be able to speak and read/write English
    • Strong (preferably 3+ years) Java 8 experience
    • Strong Spigot/Bukkit API experience
    • Strong MongoDB experience
    • Strong knowledge of Linux systems (Specifically CentOS 7)
    • Experience working with Redis
    • Experience working with Git and Maven
    Desirable:
    • Experience working with BungeeCord API
    • NMS & Netty experience
    • Web programming (NodeJS, PHP, Javascript, HTML5/CSS3, etc)
    • Scripting languages (Perl, Python, bash, etc)
    • AWS
    • Networking knowledge (routing, iptables, VPNs, etc)

    If you think you could fit this role, please apply by emailing your resume/portfolio to [email protected]. All applicants will get a reply, replies may take up to a week to be sent.

    Thank you and good luck!
     
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    Last edited: Feb 21, 2019
  2. Rocket
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    Rocket Member

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    I'll apply.

    While you're at it could you check my support ticket in the donation/rank issues section please? I have an issues only managers and devs can fix and nobody has responded yet.
     
  3. mat t
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    mat t Developer Staff Member

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    Someone should deal with your issue soon
     
  4. Bossgamer
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    Bossgamer Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Oooo exciting.
    I passed Computer Science in high school... I know python, a tiny bit of java and can create websites with html & css but otherwise I'm useless trash.
     
    Last edited: Feb 19, 2019
  5. Bard
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    Bard Active Member

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    I know how to install forge does that count
     
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  6. Rocket
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    Rocket Member

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    I can do everything listed but I couldn't figure out how to install Forge for my life. :hilarious:
     
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  7. Frxn
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    Frxn Active Member

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    I once found out how to make a custom texture pack :) I don't know how to do it anymore but does it count?

    Also iako m0gliEz

    Also, Lee has been off for a few days and Myrm, well... Does this mean you are the only dev now? Or is Lee just taking a break
     
  8. Arceus
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    Arceus Active Member

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    Leeeroieee was last seen 2 days ago in-game.

    m0gliez could be a developer but hes not applying.
     
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  9. MrGallifrey
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    MrGallifrey Active Member

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    I feel like you're missing an uncle sam type picture at the top
     
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  10. Eleanora
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    Eleanora Experienced Member

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    Im applying for this I know how to put a texture pack into the game!!
     
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  11. i_am_youtuber
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    i_am_youtuber Member

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    i gotchu

    [​IMG]



    did you really think i'd leave mat t out
    [​IMG]
     
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  12. DegenerateGnome
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    lol, I fit the web programming and scripting stuff, but I rarely touch java, good luck finding devs though!
     
  13. Acceptation
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    Acceptation Member

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    I know how to go into creative and destroy everyone. pls recruit me
     
  14. MrGallifrey
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    MrGallifrey Active Member

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    Matt thank you so much <3 mat t
     
  15. Manubidoo
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    Manubidoo Ginger

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    I'd just like to interject for a moment. What you're referring to as Linux, is in fact, GNU/Linux, or as I've recently taken to calling it, GNU plus Linux. Linux is not an operating system unto itself, but rather another free component of a fully functioning GNU system made useful by the GNU corelibs, shell utilities and vital system components comprising a full OS as defined by POSIX. Many computer users run a modified version of the GNU system every day, without realizing it. Through a peculiar turn of events, the version of GNU which is widely used today is often called "Linux", and many of its users are not aware that it is basically the GNU system, developed by the GNU Project. There really is a Linux, and these people are using it, but it is just a part of the system they use. Linux is the kernel: the program in the system that allocates the machine's resources to the other programs that you run. The kernel is an essential part of an operating system, but useless by itself; it can only function in the context of a complete operating system. Linux is normally used in combination with the GNU operating system: the whole system is basically GNU with Linux added, or GNU/Linux. All the so-called "Linux" distributions are really distributions of GNU/Linux. Many users do not understand the difference between the kernel, which is Linux, and the whole system, which they also call “Linux”. The ambiguous use of the name doesn't help people understand. These users often think that Linus Torvalds developed the whole operating system in 1991, with a bit of help. Programmers generally know that Linux is a kernel. But since they have generally heard the whole system called “Linux” as well, they often envisage a history that would justify naming the whole system after the kernel. For example, many believe that once Linus Torvalds finished writing Linux, the kernel, its users looked around for other free software to go with it, and found that (for no particular reason) most everything necessary to make a Unix-like system was already available. What they found was no accident—it was the not-quite-complete GNU system. The available free software added up to a complete system because the GNU Project had been working since 1984 to make one. In the The GNU Manifesto we set forth the goal of developing a free Unix-like system, called GNU. The Initial Announcement of the GNU Project also outlines some of the original plans for the GNU system. By the time Linux was started, GNU was almost finished. Most free software projects have the goal of developing a particular program for a particular job. For example, Linus Torvalds set out to write a Unix-like kernel (Linux); Donald Knuth set out to write a text formatter (TeX); Bob Scheifler set out to develop a window system (the X Window System). It's natural to measure the contribution of this kind of project by specific programs that came from the project. If we tried to measure the GNU Project's contribution in this way, what would we conclude? One CD-ROM vendor found that in their “Linux distribution”, GNU software was the largest single contingent, around 28% of the total source code, and this included some of the essential major components without which there could be no system. Linux itself was about 3%. (The proportions in 2008 are similar: in the “main” repository of gNewSense, Linux is 1.5% and GNU packages are 15%.) So if you were going to pick a name for the system based on who wrote the programs in the system, the most appropriate single choice would be “GNU”. But that is not the deepest way to consider the question. The GNU Project was not, is not, a project to develop specific software packages. It was not a project to develop a C compiler, although we did that. It was not a project to develop a text editor, although we developed one. The GNU Project set out to develop a complete free Unix-like system: GNU. Many people have made major contributions to the free software in the system, and they all deserve credit for their software. But the reason it is an integrated system—and not just a collection of useful programs—is because the GNU Project set out to make it one. We made a list of the programs needed to make a complete free system, and we systematically found, wrote, or found people to write everything on the list. We wrote essential but unexciting components because you can't have a system without them. Some of our system components, the programming tools, became popular on their own among programmers, but we wrote many components that are not tools. We even developed a chess game, GNU Chess, because a complete system needs games too. By the early 90s we had put together the whole system aside from the kernel. We had also started a kernel, the GNU Hurd, which runs on top of Mach. Developing this kernel has been a lot harder than we expected; the GNU Hurd started working reliably in 2001, but it is a long way from being ready for people to use in general. Fortunately, we didn't have to wait for the Hurd, because of Linux. Once Torvalds freed Linux in 1992, it fit into the last major gap in the GNU system. People could then combine Linux with the GNU system to make a complete free system — a version of the GNU system which also contained Linux. The GNU/Linux system, in other words. Making them work well together was not a trivial job. Some GNU components needed substantial change to work with Linux. Integrating a complete system as a distribution that would work “out of the box” was a big job, too. It required addressing the issue of how to install and boot the system—a problem we had not tackled, because we hadn't yet reached that point. Thus, the people who developed the various system distributions did a lot of essential work. But it was work that, in the nature of things, was surely going to be done by someone. The GNU Project supports GNU/Linux systems as well as the GNU system. The FSF funded the rewriting of the Linux-related extensions to the GNU C library, so that now they are well integrated, and the newest GNU/Linux systems use the current library release with no changes. The FSF also funded an early stage of the development of Debian GNU/Linux. Today there are many different variants of the GNU/Linux system (often called “distros”). Most of them include non-free software—their developers follow the philosophy associated with Linux rather than that of GNU. But there are also completely free GNU/Linux distros. The FSF supports computer facilities for gNewSense. Making a free GNU/Linux distribution is not just a matter of eliminating various non-free programs. Nowadays, the usual version of Linux contains non-free programs too. These programs are intended to be loaded into I/O devices when the system starts, and they are included, as long series of numbers, in the "source code" of Linux. Thus, maintaining free GNU/Linux distributions now entails maintaining a free version of Linux too. Whether you use GNU/Linux or not, please don't confuse the public by using the name “Linux” ambiguously. Linux is the kernel, one of the essential major components of the system. The system as a whole is basically the GNU system, with Linux added. When you're talking about this combination, please call it “GNU/Linux”.
     
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    Last edited: Feb 23, 2019
  16. BillOP
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    BillOP Active Member

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    omg the words are hurting my eyes how will i ever find the time and dedication to read these 17867 words

    oh but that was off topic so let me say something useful

    This thread really shows how busy the developers are. But who will ever meet the requirements anyway? lol
     
  17. archerexpert777
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    archerexpert777 Experienced Member

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    I worked at Dominos Pizza does that count?
     
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  18. BillOP
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    BillOP Active Member

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    uhhhhh idk ask mat t

    we really just need myrm back
     
  19. Parrot
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    Parrot Pho Yen Premium

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    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  20. archerexpert777
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    archerexpert777 Experienced Member

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    Not to sound rude, but after I read the first sentence and glanced at the entire post, I gave up reading this. Rather watch Pewdiepie for 4 hours straight
     
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